Monday, April 30, 2007

Ultra-portable SNG (satellite news gathering) terminals

Norsat Unveils Next Generation of Ultra-Portable SNG Terminals

http://www.norsat.com

Vancouver, BC, April 17, 2007--(T-Net)--Norsat International (Toronto:NII.TO) (OTC BB:NSATF.OB) announced today that it has unveiled its next-generation family of ultra-portable SNG (satellite news gathering) terminals -- the Norsat GLOBETrekker SNG Terminal -- at NAB (National Association of Broadcasters) 2007, the world's largest broadcast television exhibition.

"Satellite terminals are typically a trade off between portability and performance. For Norsat to provide both in the GLOBETrekker, is a testament to their engineering ability," said Tim Williams, managing director of UK-based SNG specialist, Sat-Comm Ltd.

The Norsat GLOBETrekker SNG Family(TM) is available as a highly integrated system which includes a carbon fiber antenna, motorized feed assembly, LNB, 40W SSPA, BUC, motorized azimuth/elevation superstructure, built-in inclinometer, compass, GPS; a baseband unit with a modulator, up-converter, spectrum analyzer, DVB-S receiver, Ethernet switch, DC-DC converter, shock protected chassis; a system controller including a wired display with software and a graphical user interface. Customers may elect to use a built-in MPEG-2 encoder or employ one of their own choosing.

Sleekly packaged in rugged, self-contained IATA-friendly wheelable cases, the system easily meets the new stringent checked baggage restrictions imposed by most of the world's leading airlines including British Airways, American, Delta, Lufthansa, KLM and others. The new weight and linear length restrictions are 23kg and 157cm (L+W+H), respectively.

The terminal is particularly well suited for "grab-and-go" applications and is well-suited for transport in small helicopters, planes and cars. It has also been designed to withstand harsh transport and operating conditions.

Options include a highly compact MPEG-2 reception and monitoring panel designed by UK-based SNG specialists, Sat-Comm Ltd (www.sat-comm.com). The panel includes a built-in 4:2:2 IRD capable of monitoring true broadcast quality transmissions. The monitoring panel is packaged in a single Pelican case and is available with an auto power option. The auto power enables users the ability to power the system, including the 40W SSPA from a 90-260 V AC source or a 12V DC car battery source.

The new product is on display at the company's booth, # C8547, in the Satellite Technologies Hall, at NAB 2007 at the Las Vegas Convention Center until April 19th, 2007. It will also be on display at the Sat-Comm booth, # OE311, in the Outside Area.

Further information can be obtained by calling 1-410-703-1607.

Accelerometer et al: MEMS Technology: It's Everywhere and Growing (or shrinking) Fast!

Accelerometer et al: MEMS Technology: It's Everywhere and Growing (or shrinking) Fast!

Friday, April 27, 2007

Tilt Sensors for Fragile Goods in Transport

...here's an interesting and simple device to see if your package has been handled improperly, as in "oops, I dropped it, don't tell anyone!"...

ShockWatch Tilt Indicators
  • Ship your fragile, sensitive, or calibrated goods without surrendering control of their handling.
  • Prevent mishandling every step of the way with ShockWatch Tilt Indicators.
Affixed directly to your goods or packaging, these tilt indicators detect and record unacceptable tilting on goods that must remain upright. Simple, cost-efficient and highly effective, these attention-getting devices provide visual deterrents to unacceptable handling, no matter what you're shipping.

Removal of the adhesive backing automatically arms the devices. The self-stick backing utilizes the most aggressive 5 mil acrylic adhesive available, creating a permanent bond on all but the roughest containers — ensuring that once applied, the device cannot be reset, and the product cannot be tipped without indisputable evidence of mishandling.

Additionally, the Tilt Indicators contain a vacuum seal that eliminates any effects of humidity or temperature changes.

ShockWatch Tilt Indicator products

Wednesday, April 25, 2007

Winds make tram riders a bit queasy

...another interesting application where a tilt sensor is utilized...

By RANDY NEVES, Special to kgw.com
06:13 PM PDT on Tuesday, April 24, 2007
The ride up to Marquam Hill has it's built-in adventures. But throw in a gust of wind and riders can get a little queasy. "When you come down your stomach kind of drops," said first-time rider Rachel Butler.

On a day like this it's no problem.

City of Portland

Employees can run the tram cars at full-speed and monitor the on-board tilt meter without concern.

But a couple of weeks ago it was a different story. Cabin attendants say high winds got the best of some riders. "We just usually slow it down and just chug through it if it gets too heavy will put the breaks on."

OHSU tram manager Bill say these tram cars are used in blizzards in the alps. In fact, Portland's tram has sustained head on winds up to 70 miles per hour without flinching.

But if get a side wind from the south, OHSU pays close attention. "We're watching the passengers a little bit more to see how they're taking the ride."

Tram stoppages are rare so far. Out of 17,700 trips so far, the tram has been closed three times. When it does happen, the university fires up the old ground shuttles to take people back and forth.

How often can we expect this? "It's hard to answer. It's like, 'can I predict the weather?' No I can't," said Mike Commissaris.

Tram builders say it's a wait-and-see situation as passengers build up their own wind resistance.


...even still, nice to know they are monitoring the situation! Skip

Tuesday, April 17, 2007

Norsat Unveils Next Generation of Ultra-Portable SNG Terminals

Norsat Unveils Next Generation of Ultra-Portable SNG Terminals

Vancouver, BC, April 17, 2007--(T-Net)--Norsat International (Toronto:NII.TO) (OTC BB:NSATF.OB) announced today that it has unveiled its next-generation family of ultra-portable SNG (satellite news gathering) terminals -- the Norsat GLOBETrekker SNG Terminal -- at NAB (National Association of Broadcasters) 2007, the world's largest broadcast television exhibition.

"Satellite terminals are typically a trade off between portability and performance. For Norsat to provide both in the GLOBETrekker, is a testament to their engineering ability," said Tim Williams, managing director of UK-based SNG specialist, Sat-Comm Ltd.

The Norsat GLOBETrekker SNG Family(TM) is available as a highly integrated system which includes a carbon fiber antenna, motorized feed assembly, LNB, 40W SSPA, BUC, motorized azimuth/elevation superstructure, built-in inclinometer, compass, GPS; a baseband unit with a modulator, up-converter, spectrum analyzer, DVB-S receiver, Ethernet switch, DC-DC converter, shock protected chassis; a system controller including a wired display with software and a graphical user interface. Customers may elect to use a built-in MPEG-2 encoder or employ one of their own choosing.

Sleekly packaged in rugged, self-contained IATA-friendly wheelable cases, the system easily meets the new stringent checked baggage restrictions imposed by most of the world's leading airlines including British Airways, American, Delta, Lufthansa, KLM and others. The new weight and linear length restrictions are 23kg and 157cm (L+W+H), respectively.

The terminal is particularly well suited for "grab-and-go" applications and is well-suited for transport in small helicopters, planes and cars. It has also been designed to withstand harsh transport and operating conditions.

Options include a highly compact MPEG-2 reception and monitoring panel designed by UK-based SNG specialists, Sat-Comm Ltd (www.sat-comm.com). The panel includes a built-in 4:2:2 IRD capable of monitoring true broadcast quality transmissions. The monitoring panel is packaged in a single Pelican case and is available with an auto power option. The auto power enables users the ability to power the system, including the 40W SSPA from a 90-260 V AC source or a 12V DC car battery source.

Tuesday, April 03, 2007

Rugged, Accurate Visual Rollover Warning for Lift & Construction Equipment


1017 Inclinometer Series

Rugged, Accurate Visual Rollover Warning for Lift & Construction Equipment


Rieker is continually striving to improve the ability of their tilt indicators to provide highly visible alerts for all types of lift and construction equipment. One product that continues to set the bar for early warning devices is the 1017 “ball-in-tube” Inclinometer Series. With several models, all available with customer specified color warning zones, these inclinometers greatly improve the vehicle operator’s ability to detect dangerous roll over situations before equipment damage or injury can happen.

A 1017 model is typically mounted in the operator cab of an off-road forklift (or material handler) in a clear line of sight to help operators identify when they are transcending too great a slope for the equipment in an effort to prevent a 'tip over' (or side to side roll over). These tilt indicators are also mounted on the rear of a bucket/utility truck or fire aerial ladder rig in order to determine platform level prior to raising the boom. These MIL SPEC instruments are painted with customer specified color warning zones to quickly identify the recommended safety limits for tilt set forth by the Original Equipment Manufacturer.

Over the years many versions of inclinometers were developed along with variations of Gradiometers when percent grade was preferred. Once the Industry realized that these products worked for the life of the vehicle, and were relatively inexpensive, these indicators were being applied on original equipment worldwide.

Rieker® Instrument Company, Inc. is a leading manufacturer of accurate, rugged, weatherproof inclinometers and tilt indicating instruments, since 1917. Rieker’s full line of tilt switches and inclinometers can be seen at www.riekerinc.com.

Monday, April 02, 2007

Recently Mentioned in "I Think Mining" Blog

Doing some research on the web for other applications that utilize inclinometers, I came across an insightful blog aptly named "I Think Mining" - a blog covering (you guessed it) mines and mining, covering topics in the news worldwide concerning a variety of topics within the mining industry. It seems we have a mutual interest in regards to providing information about our fields of expertise so the author Jack Caldwell mentioned this blog as an informative resource.

The point here is that by interlacing pertinent information across multiple channels, we create a greater cross referenced library of data. I'll be on the look out for other informative blogs of interest.

Keep it level!